Utah Politics has a great post about State Rep. Urquhart’s recent legislation on School Vouchers in Utah. He stated that vouchers do not hurt the core finances of public schools, and actually posted a web forum urging citizens to post their opinions on the pros and cons of school vouchers. Noone was able to effectively rebut his assertions, and therefore not only did the voucher legislation move forward, but it did so with a level of transparency and philosophical soundness simply unheard of in modern politics.

When our good friend Scottie begins to talk about a National Referendum I always start to cringe, but I do agree that modern technology allows citizens to have much more of an input than they did years ago. Now I know absolutely nothing more about Rep. Urquhart than this story, but judging from this it would be a great idea for others in the political realm to follow his example. If you have more openness like this, then a representative republican democracy is much more effective.

School Vouchers in Utah
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2 thoughts on “School Vouchers in Utah

  • Forget Microsoft. Forget the Sirius/XM merger. The public school system is THE MONOPOLY that we need to go after, for the sake of our children.

    However, vouchers are not the best answer, as they still require money running through the government and in the end would likely result in all schools being “public” in the critical sense that their existence depends on “public” dollars. Here’s a better idea – make school like auto insurance. I’m required to buy it, but I can pick who to buy it from. And the money doesn’t flow through the government coffers.

  • As usual I agree with Rip 1000% on the ideals, but sense that vouchers may be the only solution anti-choice opponents won’t kill in the crib. If private schools have additional tuition paid by the parents they should be all right. The barn door is kind of open, though, who’s to say parent x should get a tuition waiver when parent y was paying full tuition. Why can’t parent Y get the same deal? Thing is, even if you charge 30$ a month for schooling, the same price as a cable bill, a majority of the families will take the garbage-level education for free over high-end education for 30$/month.

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