A new study shows that exposure to antibiotics early in life (1st year) predicts the occurrence of asthma later on. The evidence seems to suggest that treating non-respiratory infections with antibiotics will double the risk of asthma.

Also, check this out:

Furthermore, absence of a dog during the birth-year doubled asthma risk among children taking multiple courses of antibiotics.

“Dogs bring germs into the home, and it is thought that this exposure is required for the infant’s immune system to develop normally. Other research has shown that the presence of a dog in early life protects against the development of asthma,” said Dr. Kozyrskyj. “Exposure to germs is lower in the absence of a dog. The administration of an antibiotic may further reduce this exposure and increase the likelihood of asthma development.”

First vaccines, now antibiotics?
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2 thoughts on “First vaccines, now antibiotics?

  • Wow…I’m just getting more depressed, the more I read about this. This turns out to be a constant struggle between Dad and Pediatrician in my family.

    I’m always trying to avoid giving the kid (in the picture) anti-biotics, but it’s hard to argue against your medical professional if it’s indeed someone you like and trust.

    And this article in particular is just aggravating, because you add up: under 2 years old–still getting vaccinations, a plethora of ear infections–lots of antibiotics, an entire winter in and out of the hospital for breathing (RSV) issues.

    AAARRGHH!!!

  • One thing to keep in mind is that the study couldn’t control for susceptibility to disease. Ear infections cannot go untreated. Maybe kids who are more likely to get ear infections early end up with asthma.

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